About Traumatic Brain Injury

Overview

Traumatic brain injury usually results from a violent blow or jolt to the head or body. Sometimes caused when an object penetrates brain tissue and causes traumatic brain injury.

These injuries can result in long-term complications or death.

Symptoms

Traumatic brain injury can have wide-ranging physical and psychological effects. Some signs or symptoms may appear immediately after the traumatic event, while others may appear days or weeks later.

Physical Symptoms

  • Loss of consciousness for a few seconds to a few minutes
  • No loss of consciousness, but a state of being dazed, confused or disoriented
  • Headache
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fatigue or drowsiness
  • Problems with speech
  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Sleeping more than usual
  • Dizziness or loss of balance

Sensory Symptoms

  • Sensory problems, such as blurred vision, ringing in the ears, a bad taste in the
    mouth or changes in the ability to smell
  • Sensitivity to light or sound

Cognitive or Mental Symptoms

  • Memory or concentration problems
  • Mood changes or mood swings
  • Feeling depressed or anxious

Moderate to Severe Traumatic Brain Injuries

Physical Symptoms

  • Loss of consciousness from several minutes to hours
  • Persistent headache or headache that worsens
  • Repeated vomiting or nausea
  • Convulsions or seizures
  • Dilation of one or both pupils of the eyes
  • Clear fluids draining from the nose or ears
  • Inability to awaken from sleep
  • Weakness or numbness in fingers and toes
  • Loss of coordination

Cognitive or Mental Symptoms

  • Profound confusion
  • Agitation, combativeness or other unusual behavior
  • Slurred speech
  • Coma and other disorders of consciousness

Children’s Symptoms

Infants and young children with brain injuries might not be able to communicate headaches, sensory problems, confusion or similar symptoms. In a child with traumatic brain injury, you may see:

  • Change in eating or nursing habits
  • Unusual or easy irritability
  • Persistent crying and inability to be consoled
  • Change in ability to pay attention
  • Change in sleep habits
  • Seizures
  • Sad or depressed mood
  • Drowsiness
  • Loss of interest in favorite toys or activities

When to See a Doctor

Always see your doctor if you or your child has received a blow to the head or body that concerns you or causes behavioral changes. Seek emergency medical care if there are any signs or symptoms of traumatic brain injury following a recent blow or other traumatic injuries to the head.

Make an Appointment Now. Call 786-565-8735.

Make an Appointment Now.
Call 786-565-8735.